Brilliant Presentations by Richard Hall

 

Title: Brilliant Presentation

Author: Richard Hall

Publisher: Pearson Prentice Hall

Publication year: 2nd edition 2008

 

brilliant presentations

The main reason executives fails is not because they are slack at their duty post, not necessarily because they embezzles company’s fund, but because they are poor presenters.  Learning to do brilliant Presentation has often been the challenge encountered by top executives and I tell you folks, reading this masterpiece cooked and well spiced by Richard Hall makes a good eye opener into the nitty gritty of a brilliant presentation.

Richard Hall kicks off with the first chapter summarizing basically what presentation generally connotes. Stating five brilliant phrases every presenter ought to know, he uses the ‘fires’ acronym. Richard centered the ideology of this 182pages long book on three key factors.

The presenter

Presenter’s slides and

Audience.

The presenter. Here the author says the presentation is all about the presenter himself. He is the actor who is reaching forth for the stage and thus this demand him to familiarize himself with his slides and materials he needs for the success of his presentation. He further buttresses the need to control one’s nerves, voice and maintaining good body balance at each presentation opportunities. At this point in the book, he mentions some basic posture the presenter needs to maintain while he delivers his presentation.

Presenter’s Slides (PowerPoint). Just as spanners, wrench and bolts are tools essential for fixing breakdown machines, the presenter’s slides is also of necessity for an effective presentation. Here Richard brings to light the importance of giving the layout and designing of a presentation slides also referred to as PowerPoint slides, to a competent graphics professional who will add the appropriate colour needed to it with the fact that poor visuals slows everything down and it also registers as a first impression which cannot be corrected. Quoting from his brilliant tips, he says. If you care about your appearance, then you care about your slides.

Audience. Inability to know the audience you’re presenting to can really wash off several hours of painstaking preparation. Rehearsing like crazy and not coming to terms with the audience you’re presenting to can still make things go wrong. Citing an instance of a famous motivational speaker, the author makes things more clearer to his readers through an illustration of a motivational speaker who would never prepare well to know the audience he’s presenting to until he gets it flawed. And then the author corrects such action with his prevalent brilliant tip captions which helps resonates some of the key points in this book. He quotes.

Not only know your audience but also feel their feelings, needs and hopes.

Brilliant presentation by Richard Hall, happens to be the first book on presentation effectively written with all the nitty-gritty of visuals and compositions to portray ideas to an audience. Well I may be wrong by saying that, but it is the first book I ever read that drove home the point on how to deal with presentation related issues. Richard brought all necessary technique needed to drive home his point in this one, hereby making use of his predominant Brilliant tips which summarizes some of the most important points. Eureka! At last, final lasting solutions to sleepless nights of an anticipating presentation. With Brilliant presentation by Richard Hall I bet you it is show time. Of course a brilliant Presentation can be achieved via the candid analysis of a professional presenter who has wine, dine and shook hands with several large audiences and I can categorically tell you this book will change your articulation where presentation is concerned. Thank me later, probably with some Calamansi muffins and coffee (lol).

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